Holiday for 2

It's just another reality. It's just another way to think of you.

asylum-art:

Paul Louise-Julie – Dreamy Sculptural Paintings

on Behance

Paul Louise-Julie is a French-American painter and sculptor working exclusively in paper, cardboard and acrylic. Using both traditional and modern techniques, he gives his pieces a gestural and naturalistic effect. Paul places pieces of cardboard and paper in the same geometric harmony characteristic of West African sculpture as well as its hieratic scale. Also, he is strongly influences by European masters such as Klimt, Monet, Rodin, and Eric Joisel. The artist is best known for his 3D paintings. He produces these by placing pieces of paper sculpture onto a canvas, and then adds color and lighting with acrylic paint, thus creating a sense of depth that seamlessly bridges painted illusion with dimensional reality. There is always an interesting story behind Paul’s pieces. In the first picture, the core concept was to explore the illusion of depth while convincing the eye that it is looking at the surface of the water from the bottom. Using many of the techniques developed from “Midsummer”, this piece also employs origami fish as well as paper sculpture. Combined with Trompe l’oeuil methods in vibrant acrylic paint, the end result is revolutionary exploration of depth in the genre of painting. Another work is called “Contemplation” – like the name suggests, this piece explores the relationship between deep thought and personal identity. The tranquility that comes from retreating to the solitary waterfalls of inner contemplation. Smooth, polished surface of the waterfalls also show the parallel facades of the subconscious.

(via betterthandarkchocolate)

killer-cat:

Luna by Belimas


This looks like our Juno :)

killer-cat:

Luna by Belimas

This looks like our Juno :)

(via violetretro)


galaxiesanddust:
Haruki Murakami.

galaxiesanddust:

Haruki Murakami.

(via bookporn)

mightyhealthyquest:

IT’S ALWAYS TEA TIME!

(via therecameatime)

straylightjay:

10 questions to never ask a transgender person by Laura Jane Grace

(via therecameatime)

(Source: hkirkh)

thingsorganizedneatly:

Adam Voorhes knife laurel. Read how he did it here.

thingsorganizedneatly:

Adam Voorhes knife laurel. Read how he did it here.

discosunfish:

Keeping House. Series by lesbian photographer Tammy Rae Carland — who you may know as the photographer of the Lesbian Beds series.

(via thesexuneducated)

zoeefx:

selfcareafterrape:

I don’t know how to explain what that means anymore than I know why pretty much everyone knows the feeling.
It isn’t a migraine- but every sound is grating, every touch, everything. For people with PTSD, this feeling often comes right before or after a panic attack. I’ve learned over the years though that it isn’t something only people with mental illness experience.
Things you can do:
        1. Cocoon yourself. They make weighted blankets, and if you experience this often enough(and have the cash to shell out for them)- they’re pretty cool. But if not, get as many blankets as you can and wrap yourself in them. You want a solid, stable sensory experience.  For whatever the reason, the weight helps slow down the racing heart and may even allow you to sleep.
           2, Take a shower in the dark.  Take a night light or something like that in there with you- if you won’t be able to do it in the total dark. Make sure everything is as quiet as possible, and then either take a shower or bath in the dark. I prefer almost too hot water myself. Showers in the dark are great for sensory input, because turning off the lights makes you pay more attention to your other senses, and you get physical, auditory, and smells too.
      3. Going in public? Wear a jacket. If you can avoid over heating in one- that is. Wearing a jacket will help add sensory input- and keep your nerves from picking up every stray accidental touch/whisper of the wind. Also carrying a grounding object in your pocket that you can rub/squeeze can help.
     4. Plank. Or really- any sort of thing that puts strain on a lot of muscles. Personally I like holding push up position, or doing downward dog. You probably don’t want to be doing something that requires you to move/touch too many different things- which is why you want things that put tension, but require you to remain relatively still.
       5. Joint Compressions. Start with your your shoulders- work your way down to your fingers. and then from the hips own the leg to the ankle. They advise doing each joint three times. A lot of children who have nerve issues are advised to get special brushes (they have soft bristles- and lots of them) so that they brush along their arms and legs in order to help calm them down.
       6. Beanie babies or other weighted dolls. Once again, this is something I learned from working with children. I’m not sure why it works, but it has. It’s probably that the weight provides a more solid sensory input- and the fact that it is a doll- it can also be a comfort toy of sorts.

Just a little advice on the showering in the dark: using a little bit of light is very important, and be careful to not go into a kind of ‘trance’. Showering in the complete dark can actually induce hallucinations by blocking out close to all sensory input (your brain shuts out the sound of the shower after a couple of minutes). I just thought I’d mention this because I know these hallucinations can be quite startling. I’m sure this method is very relaxing when done properly but be careful :)

zoeefx:

selfcareafterrape:

I don’t know how to explain what that means anymore than I know why pretty much everyone knows the feeling.

It isn’t a migraine- but every sound is grating, every touch, everything. For people with PTSD, this feeling often comes right before or after a panic attack. I’ve learned over the years though that it isn’t something only people with mental illness experience.

Things you can do:

        1. Cocoon yourself. They make weighted blankets, and if you experience this often enough(and have the cash to shell out for them)- they’re pretty cool. But if not, get as many blankets as you can and wrap yourself in them. You want a solid, stable sensory experience.  For whatever the reason, the weight helps slow down the racing heart and may even allow you to sleep.

           2, Take a shower in the dark.  Take a night light or something like that in there with you- if you won’t be able to do it in the total dark. Make sure everything is as quiet as possible, and then either take a shower or bath in the dark. I prefer almost too hot water myself. Showers in the dark are great for sensory input, because turning off the lights makes you pay more attention to your other senses, and you get physical, auditory, and smells too.

      3. Going in public? Wear a jacket. If you can avoid over heating in one- that is. Wearing a jacket will help add sensory input- and keep your nerves from picking up every stray accidental touch/whisper of the wind. Also carrying a grounding object in your pocket that you can rub/squeeze can help.

     4. Plank. Or really- any sort of thing that puts strain on a lot of muscles. Personally I like holding push up position, or doing downward dog. You probably don’t want to be doing something that requires you to move/touch too many different things- which is why you want things that put tension, but require you to remain relatively still.

       5. Joint Compressions. Start with your your shoulders- work your way down to your fingers. and then from the hips own the leg to the ankle. They advise doing each joint three times. A lot of children who have nerve issues are advised to get special brushes (they have soft bristles- and lots of them) so that they brush along their arms and legs in order to help calm them down.

       6. Beanie babies or other weighted dolls. Once again, this is something I learned from working with children. I’m not sure why it works, but it has. It’s probably that the weight provides a more solid sensory input- and the fact that it is a doll- it can also be a comfort toy of sorts.

Just a little advice on the showering in the dark: using a little bit of light is very important, and be careful to not go into a kind of ‘trance’. Showering in the complete dark can actually induce hallucinations by blocking out close to all sensory input (your brain shuts out the sound of the shower after a couple of minutes). I just thought I’d mention this because I know these hallucinations can be quite startling. I’m sure this method is very relaxing when done properly but be careful :)

(via betterthandarkchocolate)